Create healthier tomorrows, at work and at home

Your employees’ health begins in their genes. By understanding their unique health risks, employees have the power to stay healthy.

Contact us

Create healthier tomorrows, at work and at home

Your employees’ health begins in their genes. By understanding their unique health risks, employees have the power to stay healthy.

Contact us

Cancer and heart disease affect employers

Cancer and heart disease are the number 1 and 2 leading causes of death for Americans. Combined, the two cost the United States more than $350 billion each year, helping fuel a dramatic rise in insurance premiums.1-4

Cancer treatment alone accounts for:

  • 12% of employers’ total medical costs in the United States.5

  • Nearly 8 weeks of lost work time per year per patient, on average.6

  • Approximately 25% of cancer survivors not returning to work after treatment ends.7

Heart disease is a significant—and growing—concern:

  • On average, an employee with heart disease costs their employer nearly 60 hours and over $1,100 in lost productivity per year than an employee without heart disease.8

  • By 2035, nearly half of the US population will have some form of heart disease.9

Reduce those costs by helping your team prevent serious illness

When your employees know they have an inherited risk for cancer or an undiagnosed heart condition, they’re empowered to take steps to stay healthy, including:

  • increased or earlier screenings to find cancer or heart disease early, when it’s most treatable

  • lifestyle modifications to delay onset of disease

  • early intervention to possibly prevent the onset of disease altogether

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Healthy families support a healthy and productive workplace

 

Every year nearly 8 million children—6 percent of total births worldwide—are born with a serious genetic condition.11 For working parents, that leads to time spent away from work to attend doctor’s appointments and care for a sick child.

Help build healthy families

80% of babies born with a genetic condition are born to parents with no personal or family history of the disorder.12 Genetic testing lets your employees know more, sooner, so they can better plan for their family’s future.

If an employee discovers that they are at increased risk of having a child with a disorder, they can consider options such as:

  • undergoing IVF with healthy embryos identified through preimplantation genetic testing

  • conception through egg, sperm, or embryo donation

  • diagnostic testing during pregnancy to see if the child inherited the disorder; if so, early treatment and/or delivery management recommendations may improve the baby’s health

  • adoption

Testing trusted by experts

Invitae’s medical-quality tests are trusted by doctors and designed by the world’s leading experts in genetics and healthcare.

Our industry-leading technology makes it easy and affordable to get genetic information to guide essential health decisions.

More than a million people have accessed their genetic information with Invitae.

Invitae makes it easy

Invitae’s workflow is easy to implement and supported by experts at every step.

1. Promote awareness

Access tools and resources to help drive employee awareness

2. Online ordering

An employee orders their test using Invitae’s simple and secure online portal

3. Independent order review

An independent physician reviews and, if appropriate, approves the order

4. Sample collection

Invitae ships a saliva collection kit to your employee’s home, where they collect a saliva sample on their own time before sending the kit back to Invitae

5. Online results

Results are delivered directly to an employee via Invitae’s secure online portal

6. Personalized support

Invitae genetic counselors can answer employees’ questions and review results in 1:1 sessions (at no additional charge)

Customized options to fit your needs

Proactive tests explore whether your employees are more likely to develop certain conditions so they can take steps to try to stay healthy now and in the future.

 

See test options

Cancer Screen
Looks at 61 genes to assess your employees’ risk of developing an inherited form of cancer.


Cardio Screen
Looks at 77 genes to assess your employees’ risk of developing an inherited form of cardiovascular (heart) disease.


Genetic Health Screen
Looks at 147 genes to assess your employees’ risk of developing an inherited form of cancer or cardiovascular (heart) disease—and more.

 

Reproductive tests reveal helpful information to guide important health decisions before, during, and after pregnancy. Genetic testing helps couples understand their risks.

 

See test options

Comprehensive Carrier Screen
Tests up to 288 genes (including those in the Broad Carrier Screen) to determine your employees’ risk of passing a genetic condition on to a child.


Broad Carrier Screen
Tests up to 46 genes (including those in the Core Carrier Screen) to determine your employees’ risk of passing a severe or prevalent genetic condition on to a child.


Core Carrier Screen
Tests 3 genes to determine your employees’ risk of passing the most common and severe disorders seen across all ethnicities on to a child, including cystic fibrosis, fragile X syndrome, and spinal muscular atrophy.

 

References:

  1. Heron M. Deaths: Leading causes for 2017. National Vital Statistics Reports;68(6). 

  2. Fryar CD, Chen T-C, Li X. Prevalence of uncontrolled risk factors for cardiovascular disease: United States, 1999–2010. NCHS data brief, no. 103. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics; 2012.

  3. Cancer Trends Progress Report. National Cancer Institute. Updated February 2019.

  4. 2019 Employer Health Benefits Survey. Kaiser Family Foundation. Sept 25, 2019.

  5. Shockney L. Paying attention to cancer pays off for your employees. Johns Hopkins Medicine Healthcare Solutions. September 2017.

  6. Vuong TD. Absenteeism due to functional limitations caused by seven common chronic diseases in US workers. J Occup Environ Med. 2015; 57(7): 779–784.

  7. Sesto ME, et al. Employment and retirement status of older cancer survivors compared to non-cancer siblings. Work. 2013;46(4):10.3233/WOR-131680.

  8. RTI International. Cardiovascular disease costs will exceed $1 trillion by 2035: Nearly half of Americans will develop pre-existing cardiovascular disease conditions, analysis shows. ScienceDaily. 14 February 2017. 

  9. American Heart Association. Cardiovascular disease burden report. 2017.

  10. Harvard TH. Chan School of Public Health. The public and genetic editing, testing, and therapy. January 2016.

  11. March of Dimes. Global report on birth defects. 2006. 

  12. Blythe SA, et al. Advances in the diagnosis and management of cystic fibrosis. Clin Biochem. 1984;17(5):277-283